Don’t Avoid Your Weaknesses

Who is this for? Those who believe that the best way to overcome a weakness is by avoiding or outsourcing it.

If there has ever been a valid point that translates into poor advice, it is this: play to your strengths, avoid your weaknesses. It’s not that the advice itself is bad, just our understanding of it.

The problem with this adage is that it omits an essential caveat: you first need to understand the difference between a weakness worth avoiding and a strength you’ve yet to learn.

A weakness isn’t just something you’re bad at, we all suck at first. Weaknesses are those elusive skills or traits that, no matter how hard we try, we just cannot seem to get proficient at or learn. Understanding this subtle, yet essential, distinction goes a long way towards discovering a few new strengths and understanding your true weaknesses.

All too often we assume that an uncultivated skill is a permanent weakness. After all, it’s far easier to say you’re bad than it is get good. From there we either avoid or attempt to outsource around these challenges. I certainly did.

When I finally started getting my act together, it wasn’t because I avoided or outsourced what I perceived to be my weaknesses. It was because I shifted my attention to overcoming these shortcomings. I faced the unenjoyable facts that clearly expressing my thoughts, organizing my ideas and staying on top of my commitments aren’t easily outsourced. I accepted that, no matter how inept I am at a particular skill, I still needed a basic understanding of what others actually do in order to efficiently leverage their assistance. Once I identified these, I started pushing myself to see just how far I could get on my own, and I was often was surprised by the results.

Eventually there comes a point where focusing on your strengths and relying on others to help with your weaknesses is probably the right move, but chances are that today is not that day for you. Chances are there are still plenty of “weaknesses” you should attempt to overcome (especially if they are the ones you are ignoring). There’s also a pretty good chance that you’re a long way off from being able to afford hiring anyone to overcome anything for you.

Even if you have the resources to avoid your shortcomings, don’t. At least not at first. First try and see what you can face on your own. Test the limits of what you’re truly capable of overcoming. How? Give yourself a good once over, write a list of your “weaknesses” and try seeing just how far you can get on your own before you start pawning off anything to anyone. Put in the effort, have some faith and see just how far you can push the limits of your own potential.

This may take a little longer, but overcoming the right weaknesses will help you go a lot further than ignoring all of them.

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